Conserved Objects

The Greensboro History Museum Inc. houses more than 525,000 archival items and over 25,000 three dimensional objects. Many of these artifacts require specialized treatment by a professional conservator. Since 2013, the Adopt an Object program has funded the conservation of the below objects.

Dolls made by Trego Doll Mfg. Co. and Effanbee, circa 1920s
Estimated Conservation Cost: $2300

These rare dolls in their original clothes belonged to Anita Meares Rivers (1912-2010). A graduate of Hampton University with a degree in mathematics and a master’s degree from the University of Michigan, Rivers distinguished herself on the faculty at Bennett College and North Carolina A&T State University, and was active in Greensboro’s civic community. (2013.12.2-4)

Dolley Madison Daguerreotypes by Mathew Brady, circa 1848
Estimated Conservation Cost: $2200

Dolley Madison, wearing one of her favorite turbans, posed at Mathew Brady’s studio during the last year of her life. Two rare daguerreotypes made that day were discovered in a Pennsylvania attic in the 1950s. The Greensboro-based Dolley Madison Memorial Association purchased the items and later donated them to the Museum. (1963.87.9-10)

Brass BugleBrass Bugle, circa 1920
Estimated Conservation Cost: $425

This bugle was used by both the African American Legion and the Veterans of Foreign Wars bands for parades and memorial services from the 1930s through the 1950s. It was originally owned by Lieutenant Robert S. Campbell, a World War I veteran who served in the 368th US Infantry Regiment. Later, as an employee at North Carolina A&T State University, Campbell was involved with the campus Drum and Bugle Corps. (2006.44.1)

Civil War CapCivil War Kepi, circa 1862
Estimated Conservation Cost: $1300

Lt. Col. William S. Rankin (1824-1899) wore this forage-style kepi, or cap, during his service in the Confederate Army. Enlisted with the 21st NC Regiment, Co. M, known as the Dixie Boys, Rankin participated in many major battles, and was wounded and captured at Gettysburg. The metal “21 NC” sewn to the crown may have been added by Rankin after the war. (1989.61.1)

Brandt PaintingWatercolor Painting by Warren Brandt, 1942
Estimated Conservation Cost: $825

Born in Greensboro, Warren Brandt (1918-2002) moved to New York after high school, attended Pratt Institute at night, studied at the Art Students League and was an official portraitist in the Army during World War II. A renowned American painter with work in art collections around the world, this painting depicts a busy day at a downtown Greensboro farmers’ market. (1974.60.1)

MssColl#86--Sketchbook1975.Hilda Lanier Ogburn Sketchbooks, circa 1920
Estimated Conservation Cost: $1,700

After training at Converse College in South Carolina and the Art Students League in New York City, Hilda Lanier Ogburn (1895-1984) taught art in Greensboro, and took advantage of the view from her downtown studio to sketch the people she saw passing below. These were illustrations she would later use in her drawings, paintings and unique “scrap sketches.” (1975.89.4-5)

Revolutionary War Knit CapRevolutionary War Knit “Liberty” Cap, circa 1781
Estimated Conservation Cost: $6,000

According to family tradition, this knit cap was worn by local militia officer Captain Arthur Forbis, who fought and was mortally wounded at the Battle of Guilford Courthouse in 1781. One military historian commented that no similar cap from this era has survived. (1926.155.1)