Tag Archives | #ProjectDemocracy2020


Spokes & Votes: Pedaling the Path to Democracy for All

A daylong celebration of the revolutionary impact of the bicycle on the women’s movement of the early 20th century. Featuring rides, crafts, pop-ups, demonstrations and more. More information coming soon…

Co-sponsored with Bicycling in Greensboro, UNCG Special Collections & University Archives and UNCG School of Education

 

Carol Chats with Glenn Hinson

In honor of Anthropology Day, Museum Director Carol Ghiorsi Hart will be chatting with Glenn Hinson, Assoc. Professor of Folklore and Anthropology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Meeting in the zoom room for the first time, Carol and Glenn will explore personal, professional and community intersections of anthropology, history, folklore and the work they are doing. Topics include the museum’s Pieces of Now exhibition, Carol’s path from anthropology to history museum, and Hinson’s Descendants Project.  In this project, undergraduates are researching the stories of lynching victims in N.C.

Free program. Register to join on Zoom

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10 Things You Might Not Know About the American Revolution

Join National Park Interpretation Ranger Jason Baum from Guilford Courthouse National Military Park for a look into some lesser-known facts about the American Revolution.

Click below to register on Zoom.

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Sponsored by the Greensboro Public Library and Greensboro History Museum

Pivot Point: Chairs in the Trees

Greensboro Public Library’s Anthems of Change

Donna Washington will present her one-woman show, Chairs in the Trees, about her experiences as a black woman, with racism in America, and “otherness”. Washington is an internationally renowned storyteller based in North Carolina. She is a multiple award winning spoken word recording artist and author. Donna is a highly animated performer who has been called “a walking Disney movie” who has been entertaining, educating, and inspiring audiences with her vocal pyrotechnics, elastic face, and deep characterizations that bring folklore, literary tales, and personal narratives to life for over thirty years.

Watch the performance at 7 pm on the Greensboro Public Library Facebook page

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The Anthems of Change series from Greensboro Public Library, is sponsored by the Greensboro Public Library Foundation. Movements seeking social change have long used music and storytelling. Singers and storytellers have lent both their talents to the American Civil Rights Movement, Labor Equality, and Indigenous Rights. They have played an essential role bolstering courage, inspiring participation, and fostering a sense of community.

Anthems of Change is also part of Project Democracy 20/20, spearheaded by the Greensboro History Museum. This initiative explores American democracy through exhibitions, public programs and innovative community connections.

To Everyone in All the World: A Celebration of Pete Seeger

Part of Anthems of Change from Greensboro Public Library

Six-time Grammy nominee John McCutcheon shares an evening of music in this wide-ranging tribute to the music of his friend and mentor Pete Seeger. John McCutcheon is an American folk music singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who has produced 40 albums since the 1970s. He is regarded as a master of the hammered dulcimer.

Watch the performance at 7 pm on the Greensboro Public Library Facebook page

Watch

Register on Zoom to join the live Q&A at 8 pm

Register

The Anthems of Change series from Greensboro Public Library, is sponsored by the Greensboro Public Library Foundation. Movements seeking social change have long used music and storytelling. Singers and storytellers have lent both their talents to the American Civil Rights Movement, Labor Equality, and Indigenous Rights. They have played an essential role bolstering courage, inspiring participation, and fostering a sense of community.

Anthems of Change is also part of Project Democracy 20/20, spearheaded by the Greensboro History Museum. This initiative explores American democracy through exhibitions, public programs and innovative community connections.

Represent: Running For Office and Beyond

Many barriers exist for women looking to run for office. Join us for a virtual program with comedian, actress, and activist June Diane Raphael, and Kate Black, former chief of staff at EMILY’s List in conversation with Carla Banks, City of Greensboro’s Director of Communications and Marketing, about their book “Represent: The Woman’s Guide to Running for Office and Changing The World.”

The book serves as a tool kit, road map and journal for anyone considering running for office and is laid out with examples and resources with a touch of humor. Copies are available through Scuppernong Books. Click here or call 336-763-1919 to order.

Free program. Registration required

Register

Sponsored by the Greensboro Public Library Foundation, the League of Women Voters or the Piedmont Triad, and Greensboro History Museum Inc.

Part of REPRESENT! From Women’s Suffrage to Changing the World, a virtual program series with Greensboro Public Library

History Lunch Break: Reinventing Democracy in Germany after World War II

A conversation with historian Derek Holmgren about the restoration and reinvention of democracy in West Germany after 1945.

Derek Holmgren received his PhD from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2015. His research focuses on modern German history, forced migration, and refugees, and he is working on a book titled “Taming Displacement: The Friedland Refugee Camp and the Postwar Humanitarian Crisis in West Germany.” Most recently he served as Visiting Assistant Professor of History at Wake Forest University.

History Lunch Break brings you occasionally weekly conversations on all kinds of history with all kinds of interesting people.

Part of Project Democracy 20/20

Free program. Register to join on Zoom

Register

Or watch live on the Greensboro History Museum Facebook page

Image credit: Adapted from Дмитрий-5-Аверин / CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)

History Lunch Break: Games, Democracy, Museums, Tech

The Durham-based tech consultancy CrossComm Inc. developed “Gerrymander Madness: The Anti-Democracy VR Game” for the Greensboro History Museum’s Project Democracy 20/20 initiative. CrossComm CEO Don Shin joins us on this week’s History Lunch Break to talk about technology, civic engagement and more.

Video recording

History Lunch Break: Voting Rights, an Unfinished Story

The Fifteenth Amendment, which prevents states from excluding voters on the basis of race, is 150 years old this year. Yet the fulfillment of its promises has been a long struggle that continues today. GHM Curator of Community History Glenn Perkins talks with NCCU Law Professor Irving Joyner, Greensboro Public Library’s Danielle Pritchett and Leila Lewis of You Can Vote NC about the history of African American voting rights and ongoing, nonpartisan efforts at ensuring access to the polls in NC.

Part of Project Democracy 20/20 and the GSO Summer Online Juneteenth celebration

NAACP Voter Registration Sign, Warrenton, NC, around 1965
(National Museum of American History)

Reflections on American Democracy, with Smithsonian Curator Barbara Clark Smith

Live webcast lecture with Smithsonian curator Barbara Clark Smith discussing American democracy past and present

Our nation rests on the consent of the people. But who are the people? How should those people participate to make their voices heard? The Smithsonian traveling exhibition American Democracy: A Great Leap of Faith explores these questions, which have faced every generation of Americans since the nation’s founding. In this live webcast lecture and conversation with Museum Director Carol Ghiorsi Hart, Barbara Clark Smith recounts the thinking that shaped the exhibition and explores the unforeseen challenges posed by the earthquake shaking US politics today.

Barbara Clark Smith, co-curator of American Democracy: A Great Leap of Faith, is a well-known historian of Revolutionary America. In her career at the Smithsonian, she has also produced exhibitions on 18th-century everyday life; 17th-century Jamestown, Quebec, and Santa Fe, and Thomas Jefferson’s Bible. She is a Curator of Political History at the National Museum of American History.

The exhibition American Democracy: A Great Leap of Faith was developed by the National Museum of American History and adapted for travel by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service